Bullets: Can’t dodge instant and why that is a (solvable) problem

You don’t dodge bullets. You can hide behind things, crouch, or leap around like an idiot to make shots harder for the opponent to line up and time, but once they pull the trigger you can’t get out of the way. In fact most games don’t bother to do all the physics on how much a bullet drops or calculate how long it would take to reach where it eventually hits and just treat a bullet as if it travels instantly towards its destination.

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There are exceptions such as ARMA and Battlefield games, but choosing to not do this is typically perfectly fine because you aren’t aiming and firing over distances that would noticeably effect bullets (such as a from one end of a room to another) and so not doing this is not so much a failure as it is a smart optimization.

You don’t dodge bullets but you can effect your chances of getting hit by bullets by playing smart and not standing around motionless in an open field. But even if you are playing optimally (hiding behind cover when you can, moving evasively when exposed…) these only lower your chances of taking damage they don’t mean you won’t take damage. If you are playing a game like Shovel Knight and take damage it is because you screwed up, enemies telegraph their attacks and you should be able to dodge them. In shooters though there is always the chance of getting hit even when you are doing everything right, which creates a problem.

Basically damage is a game punishing you for dong something wrong, and your health is how many mistakes the game will let you make before penalizing you. The problem in shooters is that you will take damage in shooters regardless of how much you deserve it because deserve has nothing to do with it, probably does. This puts players are in the unfortunate situation where the game may be penalizing players when they didn’t deserve it (by which I mean they are playing well).

It is kinda a background radiation of damage, players are constantly taking a bit of damage here and there and you can’t really fault them for taking those hits in the same way you would in Shovel Knight because they aren’t screwing up like they would be in Shovel Knight, they just aren’t able to dodge bullets.

How do games deal with this problem? Well, there are two basic models we can look at to understand how games deal with problem: Halo and Quake.

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Fixing what BioShock is about

Last week I talked about how Bioshock wasn’t really about Objectivism, it just used it as a set piece. This week I wasn’t to talk a bit about how we can change that and how we can change the story and dialog to be more about Objectivism.

I don’t want to make it a completely different game (yes I do, but I will restrain myself), I want to make small changes to Bioshock not make Deus Ex in the Bioshock Universe (lie, I absolutely want to make that, but I won’t). The gameplay is still “Shoot everyone in the face” but we are just changing the context on some of the game’s mechanics to make shooting people in the face about Objectivism.

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First things first, let’s talk about the Little Sisters.

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What is Bioshock about?

likeadamnfiddle:

guilelessmonk:

Everyone knows Bioshock (the first) is about Objectivism, I mean it says the word a lot and the concept helped form the in game world so how could it not be about Objectivism?

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Clearly a game that is about to launch into a nuanced discussion about the role of government.

Finally, a game that sheds the childish binary morality systems and embraces complex concepts and seeks to explore deeper concepts, right?

Except, despite how much Objectivism matters to one of the game’s main characters that doesn’t mean that is what the game is about, or even that the game has something to say about the matter.

If you want to understand what a game is about we need to not just look at the game’s world and what buzz words are used in it but we need to look at how the player interacts with this world. And how does a player interact with the world of Bioshock?

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COMPLEX MORAL CHOICES!

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But let me defend these games (the two of them).

They are much more than their scenario and proposal.

They have a rich scenario, but they do things compeltely different than what yo uwould expect.

Let me put my thoughts in order, there is just a lot I want to say.

"Bioshock" would literally mean "biological shock" or "shock of life", "life shock". "Shock" in the sense that something happens that drastically changes life, or, in the case of these games, society.

Why Bioshock 2 didn’t have the same energy the other two had? Because Bioshock 2 was built upon Bioshock 1, whose themes were already explored. You don’t need to find out what happened to Rapture after Jack was gone. You don’t need to find out what happens next. It’s a lot like the ending of Blade Runner. You had a microstory in the middle of a macrostory.

I’m not going to deny Bioshock’s choices weren’t shallow. I wish that by saving the Little Sisters you had no bonus (they give you presents when you save them), cause that teaches the player that being good is… good. Instead, make a moral system that saving them gives you less and you are in no way rewarded for being good. How about that? Works even better cause the moral choice is, now, well, MORAL. By putting things in a calculator, you would find that saving them would be more lucrative, both to your ADAM pockets and to your conscience. Now make the player choose between clear conscience and more ADAM. That would be interesting.

Bioshock’s objectivism was a mere plot device. They didn’t work it out, because there was no need to. Everything was already there. The “perfect society” envisioned by Andrew Ryan taught us that an obectivist utopia was out of question, cause once people start to disagree with you, censorship becomes necessary. Ryan’s utopia came to an end way before the city itself fell.

So if the game isn’t about objectivism, then what is it about? Everything, really. From Foucault’s envisioned micropolitics to a meta-analysis of what is a video game, the game strikes everything. The core idea is how a supernatural/special thing would change a society, and it executes it perfectly. You are being taken for a ride during it’s last moments. You came after the party was over.

The same could not be said about Infinite. On Infinite, you are living the party cause you are a witness of the change. It builds up upon the same bases as the original: you have an impossible city, you have something that changes society and you have a man searching for something you don’t quite understand. Sounds simple, but once you apply that to an utopic society, it starts to dismantle itself. It becomes a dystopia. Infinite’s society starts to crumble once the Vox strikes full force due to YOUR interference. You are the catalyst, the one variable that changed everything.

My only complaint here is that I didn’t feel like so the first time I played it through. But again, it wouldn’t be a good game if it was over after it ended.

Personally, I think Bioshock games are to games what Kubrick’s movies were to movies. But that’s just my opinion.

I appreciate the feedback, and while I like a lot of your points there was some stuff I wanted to push back on.

A lot of people have said similar things to me about the game not needing to directly comment on Objectivism because the entire city of Rapture was a commentary about why Objectivism is unsustainable, my problem with that is that it isn’t clear that Rapture was an Objectivist utopia and it isn’t clear that it fell because it was a Objectivist utopia.

(Let me preface this by laying out my biases: I think Objectivism is really, really dumb.)

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(Reblogged from likeadamnfiddle)

This is a culture war. The right side is winning, at great cost. At great personal costs to people like Anita Sarkeesian, Leigh Alexander, Zoe Quinn and even Jennifer Lawrence, and countless others who are on the frontlines of creating new worlds for women, for girls, for everyone who believes that stories matter and there are too many still untold. We are winning. We are winning because we are more resourceful, more compassionate, more culturally aware. We’re winning because we know what it’s like to fight through adversity, through shame and pain and constant reminders of our own worthlessness, and come up punching. We know we’re winning because the terrified rage of a million mouthbreathing manchild misogynists is thick as nerve gas in the air right now.

Us Social Justice Warriors – this is me, stealing that word in order to use it against my enemies- are winning the culture war by tearing up the rulebook, and there’s nothing the sad, mad little boys who hate women and queers and people of colour can do about it. Nothing, at least, that doesn’t sabotage their strategy, because they can win their game from day to day, but they’re losing the war. They can punish me for writing this, and I’m sure they will, but that will only prove my point. I’m not afraid anymore.

Every time they make an example of one of us, ten more stand up in outrage to hold her up or take her place.

We are stronger, smarter and more numerous than anyone imagined, and we are not to be fucked with.

(Reblogged from femfreq)

The problem here is that these squealing man-children, so desperate to keep women out of their precious games, want it both ways. They want gaming to be taken seriously as a culture and art form, while at the same time throwing an unbelievable tantrum when subjected to serious criticism. This is ludicrous and immature on so many levels. Gaming isn’t for you, anymore. Gaming is for everyone. Everyone gets to have their say, to make their criticism, and gaming doesn’t need you to defend it.

The only thing left for these people to do is put their toys back in the pram and huddle together as the tide rises against them, until they wake up in five year’s time and realise that Assassin’s Creed 7 was actually a pretty good game, even though they had to waste three precious seconds flicking the gender over to ‘male’ on the character creation screen so they can feel comfortable again. Change is inevitable, especially when half of the freaking gamers in the country are women and actually want to play some games that don’t treat them like disposable trash.

So, here’s another change for you: if you really think feminism, or women, are destroying games, or that LGBT people and LGBT relationships have no place in games, or that games in any way belong to you or are “under attack” from political correctness or “social justice warriors”: please leave this website. I don’t want your clicks, I don’t want your hits, I don’t want your traffic. Leave now and please don’t come back.

(Reblogged from more-than-tits)

What is Bioshock about?

Everyone knows Bioshock (the first) is about Objectivism, I mean it says the word a lot and the concept helped form the in game world so how could it not be about Objectivism?

image

Clearly a game that is about to launch into a nuanced discussion about the role of government.

Finally, a game that sheds the childish binary morality systems and embraces complex concepts and seeks to explore deeper ideas, right?

Except, despite how much Objectivism matters to one of the game’s main characters that doesn’t mean that is what the game is about, or even that the game has something to say about the matter.

If you want to understand what a game is about we need to not just look at the game’s world and what buzz words are used in it but we need to look at how the player interacts with this world. And how does a player interact with the world of Bioshock?

image

COMPLEX MORAL CHOICES!

Read More

GuilelessMonk 2 Year Anniversary Giveaway Over

That was fun. Hope everyone got something they wanted.

Note: I’m going to delete all but the first post about the giveaway.

GuilelessMonk 2 Year Anniversary Giveaway

Every 1/2 hour until all the games are given away I will ask a simple question and all you have to do to win is be the first to send me the answer and your email and the game you would like off the below list so I can send the game to your email (all games are Steam Games).

New question to answer:
Who is your favorite game developer? Answered

All games Given Away!

Games are first come first served.

  • Divinity: Original Sin
  • Gone Home
  • Shovel Knight
  • Crypt of the NecroDancer
  • Transistor
  • Long Live the Queen
  • Papers, Please
  • Mark of the Ninja
  • Spec Ops: The Line
  • The Binding of Issac + Wrath of the Lamb DLC

discovergames:

mrnelson007:

So I had an idea. (Now’s a good time to run.)

I’d like to set up a writing group on here. (Crazy, I know. There’s not any of them around here! Gasp!)

But here’s what I’m thinking: I’d like to do a prompt-of-the-week sort of deal, but with a twist. Instead of having a blog that posts the prompt for anyone to write, I’d like to make it so the prompts are submitted from outside and the group does them.

Here’s the basic idea as I see it.

1)People submit prompts.

2)The prompt of the week gets selected from the submissions.

3)Everyone in the group who feels like writing based on the prompt does so, and they turn them in.

4)The submissions get posted to the blog with a number instead of a name, and everyone in the group and external can vote on the number they like best. (Once the voting is over you’re welcome to admit which one is yours but this would keep people from just picking their favorite author every time.)

5)The writer with the most votes gets to pick the next prompt and it repeats.

What do you guys think? If I set up something like this would anyone be interested in participating?

I’m down for this.

Sounds fun. (Implied in-ness)

(Reblogged from discovergames)