Pokemon Game Update

jtvoltage:

guilelessmonk:

I’ve decided on the roster and chosen their movesets. So leveling up doesn’t get you stats but every time you level up you learn a new move. Max level is 20 so each Pokemon learns 20 moves from leveling and can learn others via TMs. So I’ve set on 94 Pokemon, 46 evolutionary lines each with their own unique ability. I tried get a good swath of Pokemon focusing on Pokemon that represent their type and their own unique niche. I didn’t want Pokemon with duplicate purposes (there is only 1 normal/flying 3 stage evolution bird). I also didn’t want to include fluff Pokemon that are really bad so for some I did push their stats around a bit or change their ability to make them more viable in their niche or to give them their own niche.
I just finished putting the moveset, stats, ability (abilities aren’t implemented fully though), and evolutions for each Pokemon into my game which took forever and I’m happy that it is done. As I play test the game these numbers will undoubtedly change but right now the Pokemon I have with the highest stats for each stat are:
HP - Tangrowth
Att - Gyarados
Def - Golem
SpA - Reuniclus
SpD - Garbodor
Spd - Pidgeot

Full list after the bump if you want, sorry about the length:

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No Porygon Z or Glalie?

No Porygon Z becuase it is an evolution that drastically changes stat distribution (lowers Def and SpD but increases SpA and Spd) and I didn’t want evolutions that felt like traps. Pokemon does it with a couple but it is mostly fine because there is so much information about Pokemon out there that players can see it coming, mine though isn’t going to have 100 wikis about it and so I don’t want to ask players to make trade offs if they don’t know what they are.

No Glalie just because I didn’t know if I wanted to code in multiple evolutions for each Pokemon and so I made the list conservative in that regard (this is also why no Eevee). So Snorunt evolves only into Froslass because I like Froslass more (I love Ghost Pokemon, this is reflected in the Pokemon I chose as there are more Ghost Pokemon then there really should be).

Though Glalie’s hidden ability “Moody" does make an appearance, just not on Snorunt.

(Reblogged from jtvoltage)

Pokemon Game Update

I’ve decided on the roster and chosen their movesets. So leveling up doesn’t get you stats but every time you level up you learn a new move. Max level is 20 so each Pokemon learns 20 moves from leveling and can learn others via TMs. So I’ve set on 94 Pokemon, 46 evolutionary lines each with their own unique ability. I tried get a good swath of Pokemon focusing on Pokemon that represent their type and their own unique niche. I didn’t want Pokemon with duplicate purposes (there is only 1 normal/flying 3 stage evolution bird). I also didn’t want to include fluff Pokemon that are really bad so for some I did push their stats around a bit or change their ability to make them more viable in their niche or to give them their own niche.
I just finished putting the moveset, stats, ability (abilities aren’t implemented fully though), and evolutions for each Pokemon into my game which took forever and I’m happy that it is done. As I play test the game these numbers will undoubtedly change but right now the Pokemon I have with the highest stats for each stat are:
HP - Tangrowth
Att - Gyarados
Def - Golem
SpA - Reuniclus
SpD - Garbodor
Spd - Pidgeot

Full list after the bump if you want, sorry about the length:

Read More

124 Word Review: Yoshi’s New Island

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Yoshi’s New Island doesn’t change much from the original game which is fine as the original is a brilliant game, the strong/unique platforming and beautiful art style remain. The game isn’t hard to get through but just getting through the game ignores the game’s true difficulty, finding all the secrets and collectibles. This allows for the game to be only as hard as you wish it to be, and it can get quite hard as many of the flowers and coins require a great deal of skill to obtain. This variable difficulty unfortunately doesn’t bleed over into the bosses, it would be interesting if they made the player to try and collect things while fighting these bosses to maintain this kind of difficulty.

doublefine:

Double Fine Presents is proud to introduce our second game, Sam Farmer’s Last Life, a beautiful noir adventure game that is live on Kickstarter right now! Check it out!

(Reblogged from doublefine)

The Importance of Incidentals: Why I love coins

hiroshimishima:

guilelessmonk:

I feel like coins don’t get their due in games, they are a fabulous thing that serve many purposes and do so beautifully.

They are an incidental item most of the time, a thing that isn’t needed to get through the level, often not even counted towards a collectable goal. They are mostly a shiny item that when you reach 100 will give you an extra life. Yet even in the relatively little value they provide to the player they are the perfect tool for the level designer to use to guide the player through a level. Actually, the fact that they are of very little value makes them more valuable since you can then use them liberally.

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The flip side of this is when people abuse the power of coins. ROM Hacks will deliberately lead coins into a death-hole - thus showing both the allure of collecting them and how little the designer actually cares for their players. It may even lead to distrusting coins. This is bad, much like invisible coin blocks make you fear seemingly simple obstacles and hesitant to proceed.

Anyways, good read.

Unless your game is about deliberately and continuously fucking with the player don’t abuse the power of the coins!

Once that trust is broken you don’t get it back and you might want it for other things.

(Reblogged from hiroshimishima)

The Importance of Incidentals: Why I love coins

I feel like coins don’t get their due in games, they are a fabulous thing that serve many purposes and do so beautifully.

They are an incidental item most of the time, a thing that isn’t needed to get through the level, often not even counted towards a collectable goal. They are mostly a shiny item that when you reach 100 will give you an extra life. Yet even in the relatively little value they provide to the player they are the perfect tool for the level designer to use to guide the player through a level. Actually, the fact that they are of very little value makes them more valuable since you can then use them liberally.

image

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decertatio asked: Do you have any insight as to developing a good action-horror game? I'm throwing some ideas around with a partner and we want it to still maintain an atmospheric horror but not detract from the action, and vice-versa. I was wondering if you had any information or inspiration that could help?

askagamedev:

I’ll tell you now, it’s actually quite difficult to walk that razor’s edge between action and horror. The main reason for this is because the fundamental principles of horror are in direct conflict with the fundamental principles of action, and blending the two generally results in one of these principles winning overall. Sure, you’ve got to build up things like atmosphere to set the stage, and a narrative that sets the proper mood. But you need to focus on the core principles, and therein lies the central conflict. The fundamental principle of action is empowerment while the fundamental principle of horror - fear - is rooted in disempowerment

The important thing to remember is that not every experience has to be uniform the whole way through. As long as you have sequences where the action is emphasized (and thus empowering the player), you also need to balance it out with sequences where the player is firmly disempowered. You need to decide early which direction your game will build towards. Both can be very rewarding and fun, but one aspect needs to be ultimately authoritative.

Left 4 Dead is an example of a great action horror game that takes plenty of elements from the horror genre and uses them to create a fantastic game firmly on the action side of things. It uses the classic horror elements of building tension to make the game engaging. L4D utilizes an AI Director which is built to vary the experience by spawning enemies in a way that builds and releases tension in many different ways. The reason this game firmly stays in the ‘action’ side is because it never presents a problem to the player that is essentially insurmountable. The game presents challenges that the players must deal with, but it is fully intended for the players to surmount those challenges. In that, the game is about empowering the player. You can defeat the zombies, work as a team, and there’s little element of actual fear involved because you know you can do it. 

On the opposite end of the spectrum is Amnesia: Dark Descent. This game is all about disempowering the player and using that to build tension. Despite the environs being somewhat similar, the overwhelming feeling from the game is one of hopelessness. You cannot fight enemies and your only recourse is to run and hide. You must actively perform each action and there are very few shortcuts. Opening a door, holding a lamp, moving about is not easy, and this serves to add to the tension because it puts the pressure on the player to perform. This causes the tension to build and build, and that lack of empowerment is what fuels the fear. The player feels small, alone, and has to deal with the added tension of performance under pressure. It’s a great environment to foster fear.

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If you want to lean towards horror, but still firmly establish strong action sequences, you need to learn to use those action sequences in service toward your ultimate horror goal. Resident Evil 4 does a good job of this by using the action sequences to provide context for the disempowerment. In order to do this, you need to make sure that the player can feel powerful and in control during certain situations, but powerless in others. You do this by using the scenes where the player was in control as a measuring stick, in order to show that the state of context and comfort that the player thought she was in was wrong. By breaking the player’s assumptions thoroughly through the gameplay, you can reintroduce that fear of the unknown and build up the sense of uneasiness in the player.

It’s important that you don’t make the entire game this way, but you use it like a texture. You make some portions of the game a place for the player to feel like she is in control, and others where she is not. Sprinkle those in with places where the player feels “somewhat safe” - there are threats all around, but they are not immediately dangerous. Try to create multiple stress points, then press on each of them one or two at a time. Examples of stress points:

  1. Starve the player of ammunition or healing items. This makes the player have to think longer term.
  2. Enemies that are difficult, but not impossible to defeat, forcing the player to decide whether to engage
  3. Obviously dangerous threats that are made obvious to the player, but not yet activated. This causes the threat to hang over the player’s head, causing performance pressure. 

Remember, not everything has to be cranked up to 11 all the time. You sometimes want it set at 2, others at 6, sometimes at 3, others at 7, etc. Provide a good variety of experiences and tension levels, and always keep that tension building toward that inevitable climax in order to really bring a good horror element to your game.

(Reblogged from askagamedev)

Let’s Talk about Investment

When you make a character in a game you want to feel like they are yours, like it is something you, the player, made. This is where customization comes in, it lets the player make something that is uniquely their own. Playing the game becomes engaging for two reasons, one because the game is fun to play(ideally) and two because they want to keep building their character.

Customization comes in many forms: appearance, stats, skills, and surroundings (customize your own town) are some of the most common examples. You want the customization to be meaningful (for appearance that means make sure they can do more that palette swaps), and you want them to have to work towards it. The ability to change your character’s build at the drop of a hat means they don’t feel like they made anything. They may feel proud of being level 50 but their build is just whatever helped the most with the last dungeon. Their personality and preferences aren’t reflected in their avatar in a deep and meaningful way because the aspects of customization are so easily changed, and so they don’t feel like they are building something so much as they feel like they are changing clothes every now and then.

So you want them to have to work for it, for example buying a piece of clothing costs money, and getting another skill point means killing some mobs. But there is a trap in requiring to much investment and locking them to heavily into their choices, and the trap is that they won’t come up with their own builds.

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btxsqdr:

aeronik:

Super excited to be able to start pimping this round!

This is the Armello Horrors & Heroes teaser that myself and a few colleagues have been working on recently.

What’s Armello? Well since you ask, it’s a digital board game of heroes and high adventure, set in a fairy tale animal kingdom. It’s being made by a talented group called League of Geeks and I’ve been fortunate be involved on the art and design side of things.

Today marks the start of the Kickstarter campaign designed to bring the game from alpha to release. Check out the page, it’s got all the info on the game, the world and characters plus some super cool rewards for backers.

After so much work by so many talented folks it’s great to see this picking up momentum.

kickstart this. what an awesome trailer

(Reblogged from btxsqdr)

Lemma Kickstarter…Help!

discovergames:

fancyboxstudios:

Lemma Kickstarter Page!

Hey guys, i know we don’t have a ton of followers, but as we just updated the previous post, we will be having Evan Todd who is another indie game developer from Ohio on our first “whatsinthebox” tomorrow night. He has a kickstarter going of what looks like quite an interesting game. Reminds me a lot of Mirror’s Edge, and I personally think that’s awesome.

The game has already been Steam Greenlit, but the Kickstarter has only 9 days left to go. He’s reached almost half his goal, but still needs 6k. Let’s help him get there! 

Reblog this if you could! And tweet it! and whatever else you fancy!

Thanks,

-Aaron

Signal boost.

(Reblogged from discovergames)